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First Time Ever: SWC's Academy Award®-Winning "Genocide" Broadcast into Iran on the Eve of International Holocaust Remembrance Day

January 25, 2013

“This is a big thing ... Iran is the center of denial of the Holocaust in the entire world”
                                                                         — Rabbi Marvin Hier, New York Times

In an historic break-through, the Simon Wiesenthal Center's Academy Award-winning documentary, the first film on the Holocaust to receive an Academy Award, narrated by
Elizabeth Taylor and Orson Welles has been broadcast into Iran with Farsi subtitles.

January 25, 2013
Holocaust Film to Be Broadcast to Iran
By MICHAEL CIEPLY

LOS ANGELES —You just can’t keep an Oscar-winning documentary down. “Genocide,” a Holocaust film that won the best documentary feature Oscar in 1982, resurfaced this week in one of the unlikeliest of settings: On satellite broadcasts into Iran and elsewhere in the Middle East.

Rabbi Marvin Hier, who is the dean and founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center here, as well as a producer of “Genocide,” said two showings of the documentary were scheduled for broadcast on Friday by opponents of the current government of Iran. “This is a big thing,” Rabbi Hier said in a telephone interview this week. “Iran is the center of denial of the Holocaust in the entire world.”

A similar 2005 effort by the Wiesenthal Center broadcast a short clip of the film into Iran; but this time around, the entire documentary, which has a running time of 88 minutes, is being shown, and posted online and streamed on Iranntv.com.

The broadcasts, Rabbi Hier added, were timed to introduce the United Nations Holocaust Remembrance Day, which is Sunday.

 

     

The story of the millions of men, women and children who fell victim to Hitler’s “Final Solution.” A unique multi-image documentary, which combines historical narrative with actual stories of ordinary people, caught up in the Nazi reign of terror. Narrated by Elizabeth Taylor and Orson Welles.

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